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November 2018 Archives

Las Vegas uses AI to improve highway safety

Artificial intelligence is fueling advances in driverless vehicle technology. With thousands of cars already on the road in pilot programs here in the U.S., it would seem that the future is not now, but certainly very soon. However, while these technological advances are used to operate vehicles, they are also being used to help traffic officials and drivers predict and respond to motor vehicle accidents.

Venture capital company no cure for elder care facilities

The HCR ManorCare chain of nursing homes struggled for five years before filing bankruptcy in 2017. Owned by the Carlyle Group, which is a top tier private equity firm, the second largest nursing home group in the country put an estimated 25,000 patients in harm’s way by not properly caring for patients and not providing a safe and clean environment to live in. 

SUVs leading cause for increase in pedestrian deaths

SUVs are a common part of the motor vehicle landscape here in Albuquerque and across the United States. Families love them because the vehicles can provide more room for hauling kids. People feel safer because of the larger size. The four-wheel drive option is helpful in the winter. Some people just find them easier to get in to and out of.

New York Jet raises awareness of abdominal injuries

Taylor Haugens was a 15-year-old wide receiver going across the middle of the field in 2008 when he was sandwiched between two defenders. The hits, one from the front and one from behind, ruptured his liver. Despite being immediately rushed to the hospital where emergency surgery was conducted, Haugens died a few hours after the hits. According to Haugens' parents, the surgeons told them their son's internal organs looked like he had been in a car crash.

MGM Resorts looks to settle with victims of Las Vegas Shooting

MGM Resorts has announced that it now is looking at possible negotiations to settle with the victims of the Harvest Festival shooting in 2017. This is a change in direction from a deeply unpopular approach where the company preemptively sued victims in order to minimize the amount of compensation paid to victims and their families. All told, there were 58 fatalities, an estimated 500 shot or injured in the melee and thousands more with broken bones, bumps and bruises. Regardless of the injury, many were traumatized by the experience.